Remodelaholic http://www.remodelaholic.com Let us help you remodel your house from builder grade to BEAUTIFUL! DIY projects that reduce, reuse, recycle, repurpose, and remodel on a budget! Thu, 24 Apr 2014 12:00:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9 Vertical Hanging Indoor Planter http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/vertical-hanging-indoor-planter/ http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/vertical-hanging-indoor-planter/#respond Thu, 24 Apr 2014 12:00:52 +0000 http://www.remodelaholic.com/?p=52822 Hi there! Janel here from NellieBellie. Are you ready for a great tip for getting clean air and pretty plants in the same project? Well, you are in luck because that is exactly what we have for you today. (cue applause) Did you know that certain plants have the ability to purify the air? What?!? […]

The post Vertical Hanging Indoor Planter appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>

Hi there! Janel here from NellieBellie. Are you ready for a great tip for getting clean air and pretty plants in the same project? Well, you are in luck because that is exactly what we have for you today. (cue applause) Did you know that certain plants have the ability to purify the air? What?!? So today’s project is a space saver, air purifier, and beautifying project. (cue more applause)

Create a Vertical Indoor Hanging Planter #remodelaholic

This is our vertical hanging indoor planter in operation. Hanging on our office’s closet door holding beautiful air purifiers! Do you want your own? Well, this is fast and easy!

  vertical planter materials

How to Create a Hanging Indoor Planter

Materials:

  • over door shoe organizer (you’ll want a plastic one!)
  • outdoor ModPodge (or clear shipping tape)
  • soil
  • plants

vertical plant holder modpodge

Step 1.

The first thing you need to do is make your organizer water tight so that you won’t have drips of water all over your floor everytime you water your plants. We covered the back of our organizer in multiple layers of outdoor ModPodge to make it watertight. Using clear shipping tape would be another great option. Either way, you want to be sure that your organizer won’t seep water.

vertical plant hanger filling.

Step 2.

Fill your pockets with soil and plants (a list of some purifying plants is at the bottom of this post!). This could get a bit messy, cover your floor, and be ready with a vacuum. Think about if you are going to fill every pocket or leave a few empty. (we left many empty to clip photo’s to the front of. we think that is kind of cool!)

vertical plant hanger clipping

Step 3.

Vacuum your mess, hang your new hanger on the door, and clip photo’s to it (if you so choose!). Now, if you use a vine you can use clothes hangers to help that vine “climb” your hanger.

Create a Vertical Indoor Hanging Planter #remodelaholic

Some plants that purify the air:

  • Spider Plants
  • English Ivy
  • Aloe
  • Gerber daisy
  • Snake Plant
  • Golden Pothos
  • Chinese evergreen
  • Heart leaf philodendron

We hope you find this space-saving little project useful to your home! Stop by nelliebellie.com for great tips, ideas, and recipes when you get a chance! Our site is always open (well, of course, it’s a website :))

—————————————–

Add some greenery to your space with a DIY cement planter 

or check out these ideas for small-space renter-friendly gardening

gardening wayfair

The post Vertical Hanging Indoor Planter appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>
http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/vertical-hanging-indoor-planter/feed/ 0
Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/garden-arbor-diy-building-plans/ http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/garden-arbor-diy-building-plans/#comments Wed, 23 Apr 2014 13:00:00 +0000 http://www.remodelaholic.com/?p=54545 We love a good vegetable garden!  We spent a lot of time getting  the raised beds and concrete patio in place last year in our back yard!!  You can see all our current backyard projects we’ve worked on here if you are interested.  Now that all the main layout and structural elements of the yard are in place, […]

The post Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>

We love a good vegetable garden!  We spent a lot of time getting  the raised beds and concrete patio in place last year in our back yard!!  You can see all our current backyard projects we’ve worked on here if you are interested.  Now that all the main layout and structural elements of the yard are in place, we can start working on some of the fun *extra* stuff.

One thing we wanted last year is a bit more height in our garden.   So, we decided to build a climbing garden arbor first thing this year.  We are so excited to let the cucumbers, grape tomatoes and another few great vine plants grow up the arbor!  It will be awesome to walk under it and pick dinner!  I tell you – it’ll be magical!!

The best news is that, it was pretty simple to make and it only took a day to build it.  The total cost was just over $100.  That sounds good to me considering similar arbors cost anywhere from $250 bucks and they are not customized to my space…

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans remodelaholic

Also, it may just be me, but I think this might be a fun arbor to build at a slightly larger scale for a wedding or a reception…  !  The Gothic arch on the arbor is so pretty and with a climbing flowering vine on it… again magical!  Don’t ya think?

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans (4 of 5)

Fabulous!

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans 2

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans 3

Tools List

  • Miter Saw
  • Circular Saw
  • Jig Saw
  • Drill
  • Orbital Sander
  • 1/2″ Drill Bit
  • Measuring Tape
  • Pocket Hole Jig (We love the Kreg Jig!)
  • Pencil

Supplies List (rough lumber and hardware; letters correspond with the parts list of the arbor)

  • A - (4) 2×6 – 10′ (corner posts)
  • B – (4) 2×6 – 8′  (horizontal supports)
  • C – (2) 2×12 – 8′ – (arches)
  • D – (2) 2×4 – 4′ (side cross braces)
  • E – (1) 2×4 – 4′ (top brace)
  • F – (2) 4′x8′ sheets of 4″ o.c. concrete reinforcement mesh (sides of arches)
  • (4) 1/2″ – 6″ galvanized bolts
  • (8) 1/2″ galvanized washers
  • (4) 1/2″ galvanized nuts
  • (1) box 2 1/2″ deck screws
  • (4) 1 1/2″ pocket screws (for connecting the top brace)
  • (15) 12″ plastic zip ties

Parts List

  • A – Corner Columns/Posts
  • B – Horizontal Supports
  • C – Arches
  • D – Side Cross Brace
  • E – Top Cross Brace
  • F – Concrete Wire Mesh

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans 4

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans 5

Exploded Diagram

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans 6

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans Construction Steps - 

Cut out all the pieces according to the dimensions above, or change them as needed to fit your space.  Then for installation, just repeat the instructions for the front and back, then that connect the two sides.

1. Cut Corner Columns/Posts

Cut the top of all four corner posts at an angle.  I cut mine at a 5 degree angle from the center of the post.  This will keep water from staying on top of the post, and keep the wood from rotting out fast.  You can always do a bigger angle if you want, we wanted it to be less noticeable, so we kept our small.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-2

2. Level and Anchor!

We decided to install the garden arbor over the path that entered into our box garden area, right off the patio.  This allowed us to anchor the arbor to the raised garden beds.  That way we didn’t need footings.

It all depends on where you what to install yours on how it needs to be anchored.  You could anchor it to a patio, concrete footings in the ground, a fence, or garden boxes like ours.  Whatever you choose to do, you must anchor your arbor, so you are safe from it blowing over in the wind or getting knocked over by climbing kiddos and hurting someone.

Before cutting the wood to the final length, check for level.  Our patio slants at a 2% grade, which made one side of the arbor 1″ taller, in order to make it level across the top.  Pictured below, is an easy way to check.  By spanning a board across with a level on top, I was able to measure the difference from the top of the leveled board to the ground.  And add the difference to the longer side.  Once the corner posts were cut to length and angled on top, Screw to the side of the boxes (or secure to the other anchor options).

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-4 Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-5

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-20

3. Cut the Profile!

Next, cut out the profile for the horizontal supports.   I matched a design feature already existing in our backyard on the stairs that we fixed last year.   With a piece of cardboard, I made a template to trace on the ends of the new horizontal supports.

**When adding to an already designed back yard mimicking some of the design elements already in place, either on your home or other structures, can help to pull things together.  So, keep in mind, that this particular design element can change to something that fits your yard better if desired.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-7 Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-6
                          matching existing curve detail                   cutting out curve detail on horizontal supports

4. Cut Out Arches

Now cut out the arch pieces.  I’ve tried to break down each step.  Feel free to ask questions…

Start by printing a copy of the arch piece image with all the dimensions.  You just need to measure out and cut one piece, then you can trace that as a pattern on the following 3 boards.  On the first piece of wood, I started by drawing the two main arcs.  The final width between the two line should be 5-1/2″.  To draw the arc lines perfectly here are the steps:

Drawing the Arcs:

  1. Set up a board perpendicular the the arch board.
  2. Locate the center of the arc radius (which is 3′ 5-3/8″ according to the diagram above), on the perpendicular board and screw a screw into that radius point.Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-10
  3. Now, tie a string (approximately 1′ longer in length than the actual radius) to that screw at the center radius point.
  4. Wrap or tie the string around the pencil at the radius length (this is one reason why you need a little excess string)Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-9
  5. Keeping the pencil as straight up and down as possible, use the string to guide the pencil and you will create the perfect arc.

After the inside arc is drawn add 5 1/2″ the length of the string, secure the pencil in place again and draw the outside arc following the same general steps as above.

vegetable garden arbor

Here are the final arcs drawn on the 2×12.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-19
Once the arcs are drawn, you can begin to draw in the end marks.  Start by marking the overall length between the two ends, or the bottom distance of the arch piece, that is listed above on the diagram as 2′-9 11/16″.  These marks will be the the inside corners of the arch.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-27

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans 5

On the bottom corner, follow the steps shown in the picture.

  1. Place square on inner arc, end mark.
  2. Measure 1” in toward the outer arc.
  3. Pivot the other arm of the square until it measures 1′ 1-1/16” when it intersects the outer arc.
  4. Trace the square line onto the board.

1 how to build a gothic arched garden arbor-28

It will look something like this once it is drawn on:

Arbor project 089

Now, repeat the steps above on the other side, with a couple different measurements.  Follow these steps, as shown in the picture below:

  1. Place square on inner arc, end mark.
  2. Measure 5 1/2” in toward the outer arc.
  3. Pivot the other arm of the square until it measures 1-1/16” when it intersects the outer arc.
  4. Trace the square line onto the board.

2 how to build a gothic arched garden arbor-29

Use the circular saw to cut off the straight edges.  **If you don’t have a circular saw you can use your jig saw for this step too.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-30 Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-31

Use the Jig Saw to cut around the arcs.  Go slow and steady.  Try and keep the blade from bending as you go around the arch.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-32

Once that is all cut out, take that initial piece and use it as a template for the other three arch pieces.  THANK HEAVEN!  That will make life a LOT easier!  I promise!

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-34

Sand and clean up any raw edges.

5. Assemble

Now that you have all the pieces cut out and sanded, you can assemble them.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-21

With the corner posts in place, measure down from the top of the column piece to the bottom of the horizontal support.  Clamp and level a spare 2×4, lined up directly below the marks just made.  Set the horizontal support on this 2×4 to hold it in place while it is secured with a screw through the back.  The 2×4 clamped support can then be removed.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-24

The horizontal support is screwed through the back just to hold it in place until the bolts are installed later.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-23

Now that the horizontal supports are in place,  it is time to install the arch pieces.  Clamp the arches where they will be screwed.  Make sure to line up the bottom point of the arch directly with the bottom of the horizontal support.  Start to secure it in place by screwing 2 screws through each arch piece,  into the back of the horizontal supports.  (These screws will be hidden by the back top support once it is in place.  Do not screw through the front of the arbor!!)

 At the bottom of the arch piece,  pre-drill a hole approximately 3 inches up from the end through the thickness of the board (or the 1-1/2″ width of the board) into the side of the corner posts.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-36 Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-37

Once all the arch pieces are in place, clamp the back horizontal supports into their proper place.  Drill a 1/2″ hole through the middle of the three pieces.  This is the hole that the bolt will go through.  Install and secure the bolts with washers and nuts.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-41

Here are all the bolts in place, with the washers next to the wood and the nuts on the inside of the arbor.   Repeat the assembly steps for the back part of the structure.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-42

6. Secure the Sides Together

Start by securing the 2 middle cross braces in place.  You can either use a Kreg Jig  to drill 2 holes on the back of the cross braces or screw directly through the front of the corner posts which ever you would prefer.

Once the 2 middle cross braces are secure, you can install the top cross brace.  I found that it was easiest to attach it with pocket hole screws using a Kreg Jig system.

Do not install the 2 bottom side cross braces until after you have secured the mesh in place so that you can line it up properly with the end of the wire mesh.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-43

To help hold the top cross brace, clamp a block of wood below it while it is screwed in place.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-44 Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-45

After, the top cross brace is in place, you can start to hang the 2 panels of wire mesh.  Beginning at the top will help to get the arch just right.  I chose to use zip ties since we haven’t decided if we are going to stain the wood yet and didn’t want it to be permanent.   You could use staples to secure it in place otherwise.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-46

Once it is anchored on top, help the mesh to follow the arch until it reaches the side cross braces, and secure the wire mesh to those braces.   Now you can see exactly where the wire mesh will end.  And you can attach the 2 bottom cross braces of the arbor and tie the wire mesh to it.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-47

Tada!  The finished vegetable garden arbor.

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans-49

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans (2 of 5)

  It also makes a great kid car garage.. or so we have come to find out.

 What do you think?  We would love any pins or shares!  Please do not re post any images from this post on any other sites.  Thanks

 

The post Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>
http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/garden-arbor-diy-building-plans/feed/ 5
Spring Cleaning with Kids http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/spring-cleaning-with-kids/ http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/spring-cleaning-with-kids/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 13:00:00 +0000 http://www.remodelaholic.com/?p=51713 It is that time of year… spring cleaning, I know you feel me!  And somehow, you’ve got to whip your house into shape.  But I am a BIG proponent of having your kids help!  Where else are they going to learn if you don’t teach them how to clean. However, it can be hard to […]

The post Spring Cleaning with Kids appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>

It is that time of year… spring cleaning, I know you feel me!  And somehow, you’ve got to whip your house into shape.  But I am a BIG proponent of having your kids help!  Where else are they going to learn if you don’t teach them how to clean.

However, it can be hard to get them excited or keep them involved  Here are some great ideas ans tasks so you can get the little ones involved.  And bonus, cleaning is a great way to bring everyone together and make family memories as you wash away the winter grime and welcome the warmer weather!!

 Today I am partnering with Find it at Home Depot to share some tips for spring cleaning with kids!  (be sure to check out the link for other great ideas!)

teaching kids how to help out for spring cleaning

1. Work together

While divide-and-conquer can be a great cleaning strategy, sending a child to do a task on their own might feel like a punishment to them, especially if you have to keep hounding them to finish the job or do it correctly. Instead, try teaming up to work on one area together. Give them a job within their reach (like dusting baseboards or wiping walls) while you work up higher.   
 

2. Make it fun

Channel your inner Mary Poppins, toss in a spoonful of sugar “and *snap* the job’s a game!”  Turn the task into a game by crowning a Cleaning Queen or King (with a dollar store crown) who gets to choose the next area to clean. As you purge your closet, keep the game going and play dress-up with your cast-offs. Put the kids on your shoulders (safely now!) to get the cobwebs from the corners and dust ceiling fans. 
 

3. Crank the tunes

An upbeat song makes any task better. Our current favorite is the Happy song from Despicable Me 2.  Take turns choosing the next song, or race to see if you can finish the current chore before the song is over. 
 

4. Dance!

Once that music is on, move your body!  There is nothing as fun as sweeping and dancing, so grab the new Swiffer Sweep and Trap and make your way around the house.  The great thing about this Swiffer is you pick up the dirt, big and small. Swiffer Sweep & Trap uses rotating blades to pick up large particles and flicks them into a dirt bin. At the same time, the attached Swiffer Sweeper dry cloth traps dirt, dust and hair that brooms can leave behind. This innovative combination cleans up big and small messes in a single swipe.  This helps get rooms clean and ready for any DIY project in no-time, even little kiddos can try it out… and believe me they love it!  My kiddos want to push it around all day, and that is just fine by me,  because they can’t help but clean when they use it!
 
 
Swiffer Sweep and trap
 

5. Make it special

When you have young children, novelty makes everything amazing!  Bring in something new, like kid-sized gloves or special Swiffer dusting “wands”. Get your cleaning garb on with a new apron (one of those cute little Home Depot Aprons they give to kids at monthly workshops would be so fun!) or a bandana for each family member. Let the little ones do things that they normally wouldn’t get to do, like using the spray bottles themselves or climbing up a step stool (under supervision) to dust or wash windows. 
 

6. Bribery… it works!

Even as an adult, I sometimes need an incentive to make myself finish everything on my list. Set reasonable goals for what you want to accomplish, break it into manageable parts, and give yourself and your little helpers a reward for finishing each part. (Older kids can manage a larger reward at the end of a big day of cleaning.) Extra mom points for making a chart that you can put stickers on!
 

7. Work in spurts

You know how sometimes you get more cleaning done in your house in the 15 minutes before someone comes over than you do the rest of the week? Put that cleaning adrenaline to work and keep your little helpers engaged by working in shorter spurts. Clean as much as you can for 15 minutes, and then take a break. Rinse and repeat until your house is sparkling clean!
 

8. Nothing is too Small!

Don’t forget that little ones can be happy doing something small.  Give them a dampened Bounty Paper towel, 2X more absorbent than other leading ordinary brands , and have them wipe off drawer fronts or surface clean their toys!  
 
P&G and Home Depot Cleaning with kids for Spring (8 of 19)
 

9. Let them help purge

A big part of spring cleaning is getting rid of the things that you don’t want, need, or love anymore. Parting with toys can be hard for little ones, but often just having a say in the matter helps ease the pain. Set a goal for how many toys they need to get rid of (8 toys, or this box full) and help them work through what they want to keep and what they want to get rid of. For toys in working condition, donate them instead of dumping them in the trash, and talk with your kids about how happy another child will be to play with that toy that they don’t play with anymore. 
 
Once you’ve narrowed down the toys, it is time to change winter clothes out for summer clothes.  Have them help separate winter clothes that are still usable for next year.  Be sure to give those clothes a wash to avoid set in stains.   I like to use Gain flings, not only does it smell DIVINE, but it also has Oxiclean which helps to remove hard to clean stains!   My kiddos LOVE to help with laundry. I let them load the laundry tub, and throw in a fling.  I set it to start and then they can help move it to the dryer after!
 
Gain Flings
 

10. Be positive

Even if they are having a hard time listening and working try to stay positive.  Help them to do one thing that has a truly noticable change!  Something as simple as letting them spray the rugs, furnishings or the air with Febreze, Air Effects eliminates tough odors, and leaves behind a light, fresh scent.  They will notice that change immediately, you can’t help but be excited about the wonderful fresh smell of things, and they will feel like they helped out, and want to do more next time… little victories!
 
Little ones may not always do exactly what you want, and often times having them help actually makes things a little bit more work. But if you can stay positive and keep things fun, you can create family memories that they’ll love, instead of remembering that time that mom melted down during spring cleaning. 
 
P&G and Home Depot Cleaning with kids for Spring (19 of 19)
 
And Great News, if you wanna try some new spring cleaning products, I am happy to say that we are hosting a giveaway!  One luck winner will receive:
 
A $100 Gift Card to Home Depot, Bounty Paper Towel, Mr Clean Magic Erasers, dome fresh smelling Febreze and easy to use Gain Flings!  Click on the Rafflecopter link to enter.  Comments left on this post do NOT count as an entry.
 
 
And remember, you can find tons more inspiration to Bring in Spring at www.finditathomedepot.com
 
 

The post Spring Cleaning with Kids appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>
http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/spring-cleaning-with-kids/feed/ 4
25 Chair Makeovers http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/25-chair-makeovers/ http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/25-chair-makeovers/#respond Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:00:00 +0000 http://www.remodelaholic.com/?p=52726 25 Chair Makeovers Hi guys, it’s Cecily from Ceci Bean back with another round up of great projects from the blogosphere. This time we’re taking a look at the awesome ways you can refresh the look of a drab and tired chair. Whether it’s a simple wood dining chair or a curvy upholstered armchair, every […]

The post 25 Chair Makeovers appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>

25 Chair Makeovers

Hi guys, it’s Cecily from Ceci Bean back with another round up of great projects from the blogosphere. This time we’re taking a look at the awesome ways you can refresh the look of a drab and tired chair. Whether it’s a simple wood dining chair or a curvy upholstered armchair, every chair has the possibility to be something beautiful. There are tons of way you can use paint and fabric to create a whole new look. Now you can look at those out of date chairs we all have kicking around in a whole new light! Or visit your local thrift store and take home an old piece that’s just waiting to be made into something amazing.

New life for old chairs -- 25 chair makeovers via Remodelaholic.com

———————-

For more great seating ideas, check out these:

10+ Cozy and Comfortable Indoor Seating Options

Build a Custom Corner Banquette Bench

Trending Now: Kitchen Seating

 

The post 25 Chair Makeovers appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>
http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/25-chair-makeovers/feed/ 0
Happy Easter! http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/happy-easter-4/ http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/happy-easter-4/#comments Sun, 20 Apr 2014 12:00:00 +0000 http://www.remodelaholic.com/?p=55259 I don’t normally post on Sundays, but I just wanted to share this with all of you. Happy Easter! More at mormon.org

The post Happy Easter! appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>

I don’t normally post on Sundays, but I just wanted to share this with all of you. Happy Easter!

More at mormon.org

The post Happy Easter! appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>
http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/happy-easter-4/feed/ 3
$60 Carpet to Hardwood Stair Remodel http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/carpet-hardwood-stair-remodel/ http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/carpet-hardwood-stair-remodel/#comments Sat, 19 Apr 2014 12:00:00 +0000 http://www.remodelaholic.com/?p=51602  We love stairs! Something about the beauty of a nicely stained and painted staircase… or the satisfaction of ripping the carpet off the stairs! Our guest today has a lovely hardwood stair remodel to share with us: We LOVED our remodeled painted and stained wood staircase in our last house (See the reveal here and check out […]

The post $60 Carpet to Hardwood Stair Remodel appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>

 We love stairs! Something about the beauty of a nicely stained and painted staircase… or the satisfaction of ripping the carpet off the stairs! Our guest today has a lovely hardwood stair remodel to share with us:

$60 Carpet to Hardwood Stair Remodel | The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic.com

We LOVED our remodeled painted and stained wood staircase in our last house (See the reveal here and check out all the steps here.)

Remodelaholic-entry-staircase-makeover

…but if you live a little more on the wild side, check out some of these creative ways you could add color and character to your remodeled wood stairs!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

plus check out our favorite featured staircases and then 25 Great Staircases and Entries. And now that you’ve got stair envy… Here’s Stacy to share her carpet-to-wood stair remodel (you might remember her $20 board and batten kitchen island – Stacy knows how to stretch a dollar!)

$60 Carpet to Hardwood Stair Remodel
by Stacy of The Serene Swede

Hi everyone!  I am so happy to guest blogging again on one of my favorite blogosphere stops.   My name is Stacy and I spill my guts about all things DIY over at The Serene Swede. Between working on my crazy home projects and hanging with the fam, I also run my own little shop on Etsy. Working with my hands keeps me sane…I think.  Last time I was a guest on Remodelaholic I was able to share with you how I transformed my ugly Kitchen Island into something beautiful on a REALLY tight budget. Like, $18.25 tight. It was so inspiring hearing all of the wonderful comments left by you fantastic readers!  I hope that you enjoy this post just as much!

I had been set on changing the look of my stairs for a while but to be honest, until I had seen what Justin and Cassity had done to their stairs, I figured that re-carpeting them was the ONLY option.  The beautiful work they had done on theirs really lit a fire under my…well you know.  I had a few issues that I wasn’t sure how to contend with, however.  The first one being, I truly didn’t know what I was up against.  Stair remodeling kind of freaks me out.  It looks incredibly complicated!  The second is that I didn’t have that beautiful white wood skirting on the sides of my staircase.  I had carpet.

Yup! Carpet.  

Who designs a house like that? I should also point out that my home wasn’t built in the 70′s.  It was built in 2003.  There’s just no excuse for it…

carpeted stair remodel, The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic
Aren’t those little stair models precious? I think so! 

The day that I ripped the carpeting out really wasn’t too planned out.  My husband was out of town for the night and I really can’t explain what happened to me but I’m pretty sure my kids thought I had gone crazy.  We were planning on doing this someday so I guess it wasn’t that crazy.  I just started pulling up the corner to see what was underneath and decided then and there the carpet was coming off no matter what I found anyway, so I might as well just keep pulling.  

ripping up stair carpet, The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic
My daughter must have wanted proof that I had lost my marbles so she snapped this gem. 

 Step 1: Preparation

Here’s a nice little list of the materials we ended up using for our project:

  • 1″x12″ pine boards for treads (make sure they are not warped)
  • 1/4″ plywood for skirting ripped to the size you need, we chose 15 width
  • 1/4″ plywood for risers, ripped to the height of each space
  • Liquid nails
  • caulk
  • wood conditioner (always use this before staining wood!)
  • stain
  • cloth to wipe away stain
  • cheap paint brush 
  • wood filler
  • screws
  • drill
  • miter saw 
  • sand paper
  • palm sander
  • safety goggles!!
  • screw driver and needle nose pliers (to get those staples out)
Our grand total to complete this project ended up being around $60!  
Not to shabby for a complete makeover, eh?
 

We had planned on getting to this project eventually so we had already purchased our 1x12x12 pine boards for the stair treads and had them in the house to acclimate to the surroundings. Wood expands and contracts so we really didn’t want any surprises with how they fit once they got used to our house.  Why pine? Well, because I just love the look of old, dark wood and knew that every dent would show and give it character.  If that’s not your thing, you should probably go with a harder wood like oak.

Step 2: Removing the Carpet

I don’t really have a magic answer for you on how to remove it.  I just pulled and it came up.  Hopefully, you would be that lucky too!  Wear some goggles though!  Staples will go soaring, yo! My carpet itself didn’t have any staples but the padding underneath sure did!

removing carpet from the stairs, The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic

Once the carpet was removed, I spent a little bit of time removing the staples and tack strips  from the existing treads.  I knew it might be a while until we could replace the treads and I certainly didn’t want any little toes getting cut open. Once you think you have them all, check again.  I guarantee you missed one.  If you don’t find it, it WILL find you!

Sweep up all that nasty stuff that just came out of your carpet and be thankful that you no longer have to vacuum those steps!

bare stairs before wood stair makeover, The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic

Step 3: Building a Stair Skirt

I had mentioned earlier that I didn’t have a stair skirt on the edges but instead had carpet. We used 1/4″ plywood to create a skirting that could then be painted white.  We had ours ripped down at the store to 15″ W and only had to worry about using the miter saw to create the angle in the board for the top and bottom portion.   Once we had that cut, we jammed that sucker into the gap along the stair treads and pushed it up against the trim.  I wish I could say that it was an easy job but it totally wasn’t.  We used liquid nails to put it up and had to try and NOT get glue everywhere as we slid it into place.  A wet rag was SUPER helpful.

Step 4: Remove Old Treads

Using a pry-bar, pull up those crazy pressed board treads and get ready to add on your new beauties!  I had to have a little help in this department from the hubs.  Apparently, I need to work out more!

Step 5: Dry Fit the New Treads

Once you have all of your new tread pieces cut, you’ll want to dry fit them before attaching just to make sure that they all fit.  If they do, then you are golden and ready to permanently attach them. All of our measurements were different for each stair so make sure to mark which one goes where with a number or you can easily get messed up.

cut a stair skirt and fit the new stair treads, The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic
  

Step 6: Attaching the New Treads 

Once we were sure our measurements were correct, we drilled a few pilots holes in the treads to make sure that the wood wouldn’t split from the force of the screw being drilled in.  You would really hate to see all that hard work go down the drain if your wood starts splitting.  Better safe, than sorry!! Remove the tread and apply some adhesive to the supports of the stairs and place your tread back on and start adding your screws.  We counter sunk ours to make sure that we had enough room over the top to add wood putty and cover up the unsightly screw heads.

Step 7: Wood Putty the Holes and Sand Away!

We filled each and every measly screw hole with wood putty and let it dry.  After one application, we noticed that it started to sink down so our holes required 2 fillings of putty.  Once everything had dried, I took the orbital sander and sanded each tread (in the direction of the grain) first with a courser grit and then with a really fine one to get the smoothest finish possible.

Step 8:  Conditioning and Staining

Anytime you plan on staining softer woods, you should first apply wood conditioner to it to provide an even finish.  It only takes a few minutes and you will be ready to stain!  We chose Minwax Dark Walnut as our stain color because I just LOVE the dark against the white contrast.  Because our home is a split level with our main living space at the top of these stairs, this step required a little finagling. I ended up staining every other step to give us SOMETHING to walk on but after two coats per stair, I decided to try out another method. You’ll see that in step 9 :) You can also get as messy as you want with the staining process because you’ll be taping off and painting in another step.

staining hardwood stairs, The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic
 
hardwood stair remodel, The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic
It also helps to place an object on the stairs that don’t have fresh stain on them in order to remember which ones are wet!!

Step 9: Polyurethane

This is one of those moments in the project where I decided to change things up.  The “every other” method was taking too long and I was just too impatient.  This time, I started from the top of the stairs and worked my way down to the bottom doing each and every one.  Remember I said it was a split level? Well, it really worked to my advantage.  Once I finished applying the poly, I set up a fan at the the bottom of the stairs, and went out my walk-out patio door in my lower level and up to my deck patio door!  I did have to yell down to the kids to lock the patio door in the lower level once I was back inside though :)   By morning, the poly was completely dry and ready to have another coat thrown on! It’s important to sand with a super fine sanding block in between coats of poly to give it the glassy shine too, so definitely don’t skimp on that! It really only takes about 30 seconds per stair.  I ended up doing 4 coats of polyurethane for durability.

Step 10: Caulking and Paint

This step in our stair makeover was really the easiest.  We taped off the stair treads and filled in any areas that needed some “plastic surgery” with caulk and started painting away! Be careful not to get paint on your awesome new stair treads! (See? I told you could be messy with your stain job!)

Step 11: Add the Risers

This is THE best part because you finally get to see the finished product and your dream stairs take shape.  We painted each riser prior to putting them on because it would save us so much time.  I’m glad we did!  We used liquid nails to attach each piece and then used a nail gun to add some brads. Fill in all of your little nail holes with caulk or wood putty and touch them up with your paint!

Step 12: Enjoy your Hard Work

Enjoy what you did! And if your anything like me, forget that you have another stair case to finish for a while because you’re exhausted!

Turn carpeted stairs into hardwood beauties for just $60! -- The Serene Swede on Remodelaholic

A special thanks to Cassity and Justin for having me as a guest again today!  And if you were still on the fence about changing out your carpeted stairs, I hope I’ve help you see that it really isn’t as hard as it looks!

Visit The Serene Swede to see all of Stacy’s DIYing, including the epic story of her 6-year (and counting) basement remodel — I think we all have stories like that! :)

The post $60 Carpet to Hardwood Stair Remodel appeared first on Remodelaholic.

]]>
http://www.remodelaholic.com/2014/04/carpet-hardwood-stair-remodel/feed/ 9