Build a Patio Table with Built-In Ice Boxes

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Some of the best memories of summer are those of lazy evening spend with friends and family, enjoying a meal with good company and good food in beautiful weather. Get your backyard ready for entertaining with a few projects, and yours will be the house that everyone loves to come to! Our guest today has an awesome patio table building plan for you. And it has a secret that your guests will love: built-in ice boxes, perfect for keeping your drinks cool!

Patio Table with Built-In Ice Boxes

LOVE this!

patio table witih built-in drink coolers, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

patio table using planter boxes for built-in drink coolers, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Install a nice patio if you don’t already have one (see how we installed ours here) and then add some features like an outdoor coffee table,

easy diy outdoor coffee table from a bucket

an outdoor baby gate to keep the little ones safe, 

Outdoor Tall Baby Gate, Remodelaholic

or a beautiful arbor to grow your garden vegetables or flowers on (and while you’re at it, build a few raised garden beds, too!)

Vegetable Garden Arbor DIY Plans (4 of 5)

Here’s our fabulous guest Heidi with a great detailed tutorial to show you how to build the patio table! Give her a warm Remodelaholic welcome!

Patio Table with Built-In Ice Boxes
by Heidi of Kruse’s Workshop

Howdy from South Dakota!  I’m Heidi, and along with my trusty husband, Brent, we’ve been busy remodeling and building everything from picture frames to doll houses in our upcycled garage aptly nicknamed, Kruse’s Workshop.  Today, we are excited to share our detailed plans outlining our process for building an ice chest patio table, which we fondly refer to as “The Patio Party Table.”  With a few tools and plenty of patience, this project can be completed in a weekend, for as little as $150!

There are several plans circulating on Pinterest, but we felt we could improve the design to create a more durable, solid product that could withstand our brutal weather cycles.  For this reason, we do not recommend cutting your lumber to length in advance.  We feel it’s best to make the cuts as you work through the plans, which will give you the freedom to make small adjustments as needed.

Depending on the type of wood species used, materials will run anywhere from $150 – $350.  Cedar, a wonderful choice for outdoor furniture, will cost significantly more than Douglas fir, which is what we’ve chosen for the table you are about to see.  The Home Depot in our region carries Douglas fir, but only in the 2×8 and 2×6 material, so for the 4×4 legs we used Cedar.  No matter what type of wood you choose, several coats of a quality sealer are crucial to protecting the table, not only from Mother Nature but also from our children, who are bound to spill dinner and dessert on it.

If you like the benches we built to accompany the table, pop over to our blog, Kruse’s Workshop, for additional instructions on how to build them.


Materials:

  • 5 – 2×8  8′ length (table top)
  • 2 – 2×6  8′ length (ice box lids)
  • 5 – 2×4  8′ length (framing/skirting)
  • 2 – 4×4  8′ length (table legs)
  • 3 – 1×4  8′ length (ice box supports)
  • 2 – plastic planter boxes – see photo below
  • 2 1/2″ Kreg pocket screws
  • 1 1/2″ Kreg pocket screws
  • 1 3/4″ Deck screws
  • 8 – 5/16″ x 3″ bolts
  • 8 – 5/16″ washers
  • 8 – 5/16″ wood anchors
  • 120 grit sandpaper
  • 80 grit sandpaper
  • Pre-conditioner, stain, exterior spar varnish, foam brushes, fine sanding block

The table design is centered around these specific planter boxes, available in the outdoor/plant department at Home Depot or on their website.  At 20″ x 10″, they are the perfect size to hold plenty of summer time drinks while clocking in at less than $10 each!  It wouldn’t be a bad idea to pick up a few spares, in case you need a replacement down the road.

use planter boxes as patio table ice boxes, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Tools:

  • Measuring tape
  • Pencil
  • Drill
  • Table saw (optional but very helpful)
  • Miter saw or circular saw
  • Orbital sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Clamps
  • 2 1/8″ hole saw

 

Step #1: Build Ice Box Supports

The first step is to build a box to support the lip of the ice box so it can’t drop out of the table.  Using the 1×4 material, begin by cutting a half inch off one end.  Always take this first step when cutting a new board, it will give you a clean, straight end to measure off of.  Cut 4 pieces at 20 3/4″ and 4 pieces at 8 3/4″.  You will have two long pieces and two short pieces for each ice box.
how to build ice box supports for patio table, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Dry fit them together to ensure all your corners are flush.

build ice box supports for patio table, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Secure each corner with 2 deck screws.

how to build ice box supports for patio table 2, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Repeat until you have two completed supports.

how to build ice box supports for patio table 3, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Verify that it supports the ice box.  After checking that the size is correct, sand all of the edges, rough corners and sides.  It will be much easier if you sand the individual parts before the table is assembled.  Most of the sanding can be done with an orbital sander loaded with 120 grit sand paper.  Rough spots may need 80 grit sandpaper.

patio table ice box support build to fit planter box, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
 

Step #2: Build Interior Ice Box Frames

Now we need to build a frame that will hold the ice box supports and act as extra bracing for the table top.  Build two of these, one for each ice box.  Using your 2×4 material, cut 4 pieces at 20 3/4″ and 4 pieces at 34 1/4″.  Dry fit the frames to make sure everything is square and cut to the appropriate length.

build patio table ice box frames, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Set up your Kreg Jig with the following specifications:kreg jig to build ice box frames for patio table, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Set the top column at 1 1/2.
kreg jig to build ice box frames for patio table 2, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Set the drill depth to the thickness of your board, so in our case we are using 2×4′s, which are actually 1 1/2″ thick.  You can see how we have our drill depth set at 1 1/2″ here.  For detailed instructions on how to properly set up your Kreg Jig – follow this link.

kreg jig to build ice box frames for patio table 3, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Drill two holes in the end of each board.  The placement of the holes does not need to be identical on each board, just roughly centered.
kreg jig to build ice box frames for patio table 4, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
build patio table ice box frames 2, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Lay out your boards according to the photo below.  The holes should be to the outside, this will make it easier to drive the screws in without the framing getting in the way.

build patio table ice box frames 3, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Before we start attaching all of the framing together, we are going to use the ice box support as a template.  Center the ice box support (the small box we made in step #1) on the 2×4 cut at 34 1/4″.  Clamp it in place.
fit patio table ice box frames to supports, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Measure each side to make sure they are identical.  Our was 10 1/2″ on each side.

fit patio table ice box frames to supports 2, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

When you have everything centered, you can run the screws into the pocket holes.  Continue this process until you have built two identical frames.

fit patio table ice box frames to supports 3, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

When your frame is built, wiggle the ice box support out of the middle, you may need to loosen a few screws to set it free.  Sand all of the pieces with an orbital sander.

fit patio table ice box frames to supports 4, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

After the frames are built, it’s time to attach the ice box support (the small box) to the ice box frame (the large one). This is an important step, as it will allow the lid that will eventually cover the ice box to sit flush with the rest of the table.

fit patio table ice box frames to supports 5, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Set your ice box upside down inside the frame.

fit patio table ice box frames to supports 6, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Put the ice box support on top and work it down into the frame.

fit patio table ice box frames to supports 7, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Keep working it down…
fit patio table ice box frames to supports 8, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
The lip of the ice box will stop the support at the perfect height.  At this point, use a few 1 3/4″ deck screws to attach the ice box support to the frame.
fit patio table ice box frames to supports 9, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
patio table ice box section, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

If you’ll be staining your table, put a coat of stain on both of these frames now.  It will be much easier at this point rather that after the entire table is assembled.

stain patio table, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Step #3: Build the Table Top

Using the 2×8 material, cut two lengths at 61 5/8″ and 2 more at 26″.  Lay them out like the photo below and determine which side of each board will be the top, dependent on which side of the board is nicer.  Lay each board with the top facing down and label the side facing up as “bottom”.

build patio table top with ice box 01, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Put three Kreg jig holes in each end of each board, on the bottom side that you labeled.

build patio table top with ice box 02, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Take one end board and one side board and lay them on your work surface, bottoms up.

build patio table top with ice box 03, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Allow the shorter board to overhand the longer one by 1/8 of an inch.  This will create a 1/8″ gap between the long boards spanning the length of the table to allow the wood to expand and contract with the humidity levels.

build patio table top with ice box 04, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Place a clamp like this over your first hole to hold the boards level with one another.  Drive your Kreg screw into place.  Keep moving your clamp with each screw that you put in to ensure the pieces remain flush with one another.

build patio table top with ice box 05, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

You will end up with the interior frame.  Sand this section with your orbital sander, paying special attention to the outside and inside edges, as well as the sharp edges.

build patio table top with ice box 06, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Stain the inner and outside edges.  Once the top is built, it would be very difficult to get stain down into those 1/8″ gaps.

build patio table top with ice box 07, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Next we will add an additional board to each side of the table.  Cut 2 pieces of 2×8 at 76 1/8″ – these boards will be the entire length of the table.  You may need to make some small adjustments to the length of these pieces to ensure the ends are perfectly flush with the short piece of 2×8 at the ends.  Sand the two long lengths of 2×8 and apply some stain to the inside edge.
build patio table top with ice box 08, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Once your ends are all perfectly flush, use the same procedure as above with the clamp, using it to hold your pieces of 2×8 flush with one another as you screw the pieces together with the Kreg screws.
build patio table top with ice box 09, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
This is a great time to give both sides of the top a really good sanding.  Use 80 grit to get rid of the markings that lumber companies put on the boards and then 120 to get a smoother finish.  Be diligent about your sanding, it will pay off when you begin applying your finish coats of stain!
build patio table top with ice box 10, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Cut a small piece of 2×8 to act as a support in the middle of the table.  Ours was 11 5/16″, it should fit very snug.  Drill 3 holes on each end with the Kreg, center it in the middle of the table, clamp and screw.

build patio table top with ice box 11, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
build patio table top with ice box 12, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Step 4: Add Skirting to the Ice Box Frames

The skirts will anchor the ice box frames to the underside of the table.  Using the 2×4 material, cut two pieces at 66 3/4″.  Space your two ice box supports 6 inches apart.  Center your 2×4′s cut at 66 3/4″ on each side and clamp in place.   Mark with a pencil the location of 7 pocket screws, these screws are what will attach the flower box support structure to the actual table.

        add skirting to ice box frames on patio table, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Drill your pocket screws with the Kreg and then attach the 66 3/4″ skirts to the ice box supports.
add skirting to ice box frames on patio table 2, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Since the entire under body is built, it’s a great time to lay your table top above it to see that everything is lining up.  Your goal here is that the inside boxes will have enough lip around them to support the lid of the ice box.

add skirting to ice box frames on patio table 3, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

To cover the last gaps in the table top, we will cut two more pieces.

add skirting to ice box frames on patio table 4, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Cut a piece of 2×6 at 11 5/16″ (measure your opening width first though to make sure you are going to get a very snug fit).  Then, using a table saw, rip the piece down so it is only 4 3/4″ wide.

add skirting to ice box frames on patio table 5, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Drill your pocket screws with the Kreg and attach at either end.

add skirting to ice box frames on patio table 6, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
add skirting to ice box frames on patio table 7, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

 

Step 5: Attach the Ice Box Frame to the Table Top

With the top fully constructed, we can attach the ice box frame to the table top.  It’s best to use 1 1/2″ pocket screws for this step.

attach ice box frame to patio table top 01, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Center the frame on the table and attach with the pocket holes you drilled in the 66 3/4″ 2×4′s.

attach ice box frame to patio table top 02, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

For the two pieces of skirting at the far ends of each side of the table, cut 2 pieces of 2×4 at 31″ and drill 5 pocket holes in it.  It may be helpful to cut a few small chunks of 4×4 to use in the corner as a template for your leg…this will help you get an accurate length for the skirting at either end.  Center the piece and attach 1 1/2″ off the edge of the table.

attach ice box frame to patio table top 03, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
attach ice box frame to patio table top 04, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Step 6: Attach the Legs

Using your 4×4 posts, cut 4 pieces at 28 1/2″ (this can vary depending on the height you want your table to be).  Then we need to create this flat surface on the leg post that will align with a support bracket under the table.
attach patio table legs 01, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
To get the flat surface, angle your table saw blade to 45 degrees.  Make a pencil mark 4 inches from the top of the post so you know how far to cut.  Set the table saw fence at 2 3/4″.
attach patio table legs 02, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Make pencil marks at 1″ and 2 1/2″.  These should match up with the support brackets we will build in the next step.
attach patio table legs 03, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Using a 7/16″ drill bit, drill the holes about 1 1/2″ deep.

attach patio table legs 04, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Insert wood anchors and tighten with a 3/8 allen wrench.
attach patio table legs 05, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
attach patio table legs 06, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
attach patio table legs 07, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
To attach the legs, we are going to build some diagonal supports that attach to the skirting, then the legs will be bolted to this diagonal support.  Cut 4 pieces of 2×4 at 8″ long.
attach patio table legs 08, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Turn your chop saw at a 45 degree angle and cut each end so that you end up with a piece like this.
attach patio table legs 09, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Working with the same small block of 2×4, find the exact center of the piece at 4 inches.  Then make a mark at that line, 1 inch from the top and 1 inch from the bottom.  Using a 1/2″ drill bit, drill holes through the top and bottom hash mark.
attach patio table legs 10, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Use deck screws to attach the support on either side to the skirting.  Then attach the leg using the bolts and washers.  This system makes it very simple to remove the legs for storage or transport.
attach patio table legs 11, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Step 7: Build the Ice Box Lids

Cut 2 pieces of 2×6 at 24″ and 1 piece of 1×4 at 16″.  Stain the inside edges.

build patio table ice box lids 01, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Measure out 22 1/4″ on the underside of the 2×6′s.  This will be the actual size of your lid.
build patio table ice box lids 02, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Lay out your 1×4 3 1/8″ from one end and attach with 6 deck screws.

build patio table ice box lids 03, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
build patio table ice box lids 04, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
build patio table ice box lids 05, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Center a 2 1/8″ hole saw at 22 1/4″, cut a hole all the way through the lid.

build patio table ice box lids 06, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
build patio table ice box lids 07, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

After the hole has been cut through the lid, make a cut at 22 1/4″ to remove the excess from the lid, which will leave you with a half circle that acts as a finger lift.

build patio table ice box lids 08, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
The half circle will need some sanding, we found that a piece of sandpaper wrapped around a wooden dowel worked best.
build patio table ice box lids 09, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

Step 8: Apply Finish Coats to the Table

Once everything is assembled, sand once more with 120 grit sandpaper.
finishing patio table with build-in ice boxes 01, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Since we were using Douglas fir, which is a softer wood, we chose to use a wood conditioner so that our stain coat would come out more evenly.
finishing patio table with build-in ice boxes 02, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

About 15 minutes after I applied the wood conditioner and wiped off any excess, I applied a coat of basic interior oil based wood stain with a foam brush.

finishing patio table with build-in ice boxes 03, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

After the stain was dry, I applied three coats of this water based spar urethane, sanding VERY LIGHTLY with a fine sanding sponge in between coats.

finishing patio table with build-in ice boxes 04, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
And here’s what you can expect for a finished product!
finished ice box patio table with benches, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
finished patio table iwth built-in drink coolers and benches, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
patio table witih built-in drink coolers, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
patio table with built-in ice boxes, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
There’s plenty of room in the very center of the table to add a hole to accommodate an umbrella.
patio table with ice boxes, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Build a patio table with built-in ice boxes | Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic.com
DIY patio table with built-in ice boxes, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
Visit our blog for detailed plans to build matching benches for the table.
build a patio table with built-in drink cooler ice boxes, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic
DIY patio table with built-in drink coolers, Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic

DIY Patio Table with Built-In Drink Coolers | Kruse's Workshop on Remodelaholic.com

————————————-

Wow, Heidi! Such a genius idea. Can I come over? :)

Remodelaholics, head over to Kruse’s Workshop to see more of what Heidi and Brent have been DIYing in their home — you’ll love their industrial iron pipe photo display, and just look at all the details in the Barbie house they built!

Comments

  1. lilly says

    love the great idea! however, how do you drain the water/ice off the box/planters? did you drill holes or can you remove are the planters removable? Thanks!

    • Heidi says

      Good question, Lilly! There are holes with plugs in the bottom of the planter box when you purchase it, but don’t take the plugs out or you and your guests will get wet feet as the ice melts and drips out! The table was designed so that you have plenty of room to lift the box up and out to empty it. Hope that helps!

  2. Megan Peterson 4 The Home Depot says

    What a great project! I’ve added a link to one of our pinboards. Check them out at Pinterest.com/Homedepot

  3. Marcus says

    How do you lift the boxes out of the table without pushing from below?
    How do you lower the boxes into the table without pinching your fingers?
    Have you thought about adding a under-table pigeon hole for storing koozies?

    • Heidi says

      Good question, Marcus! There is a gap between the ice box and the table frame, plenty of room to wrap your fingers around the edges to lift them out. No need to push them up from below. And that’s a great idea to add a spot for koozies!

  4. Alyson says

    Where did you get the wood anchors from? The ones I’m finding online, look nothing like the ones you are using. Thanks for sharing this project I’m going to try and build one for myself. :)

  5. Donna says

    We built our table but had the frame come right off after using the suggested 1 1/2″ pocket screws to try to secure the 2×4′s to the table top….there just wasn’t enough screw to hold this heavy table together. We ended up using 3″ screws and all is secure now. This was our first real furniture build and we learned a lot. I would say most important, measure everything before and after, to ensure the cut was just right. A slight problem left & ignored in the beginning runs through the whole project. We are applying the finish tonight and stained the table and benches an almost eggplant purple color. Can’t wait to use them!

    • Heidi says

      Thanks for the feedback, Donna. We are glad you have it figured out and that it is all coming together for you. The 1 1/2″ screws may not have worked for you for several reasons. The Kreg Jig may not have been set up properly, the pocket screws may not have been drilled deep enough or your material for the top may have been thicker than ours. When you’re done, would you share pictures of the finished product – the eggplant color sounds amazing!

      • Donna says

        I built this table with my 23 year old son and husband, we all checked the instructions over and over and over! We did have the Kreg Jig set at 1 1/2″, drill depth 1 1/2″, and exactly the same wood list suggested. We very much followed instructions, no idea what could have gone wrong. We used Douglas Fir and the only modification we made was to add 1 inch to all the legs since we are taller people. I thought I must have read something wrong when it fell apart despite re-reading the instructions through every single step wanting a perfect table. Now that we are done, I love the table and how big it is, it is VERY heavy. Thank so much for sharing the design with us! I will send a picture when I figure out how to post it.

  6. Randy says

    Thanks for sharing this amazing design! I’m building one for my dad’s birthday. I had to double check the numbers a few times to make sure I didn’t mess up somehow, but it seems to me that 5 2x4x8s are needed for this. Building the icebox frames used 2 whole and a portion of a third that left it impossible to get two 66 3/4 pieces for the skirt. If the first set of cuts need to be done a specific way to allow more lumber for the end you may want to consider adding that to your instructions. Again thanks for sharing such a wonderful project!!!

    • Heidi says

      Randy, thanks so much for the feedback – and your are correct that it should be 5 2×4′s instead of 4. I have contacted Remodelaholic to have them update the quantity. There’s nothing worse than getting most of the way through a build and having to run back to the store for one additional piece of wood!

  7. Randy says

    According to your material list you need 4 2x4x8. That’s 384 inches of 2×4. Going through the instructions the build calls for 4 at 34.25, 4 at 20.75, 2 at 66.75, and 2 at 31. That’s 415.5 inches. Without even going into the puzzle that is fitting these cuts to have the least amount of scrap possible. I had to go out and by 2 more 2x4x8. Unless I’m missing something your material list is a little off.

  8. Mike says

    This is great! I’m going to give it a try this weekend. One question: when do you use the 2 and 1/2 inch vs 1 and 1/2 inch kreg screws? Also, I was too lazy to do the math, but will a 50 pack of each be enough?

    • Heidi says

      Mike, sorry I left out when to use each size of screw! We used the 2.5 inch screws for all of the general assembly. The 1.5 inch screws were just used to attach the table top to the frame. We were afraid anything longer could potentially poke out through the top of the table once it was turned right side up.
      A box of 50 screws in each size should be enough to complete this project. Thanks for reading and good luck!

  9. Jeremy says

    Thanks for much for sharing this project. My wife got me a Kreg jig for Father’s Day and I’m itching to get to work on this table for our new house. Can you tell us when you used what pocket screws at what times during the build? I’m purchasing both sizes, but I can’t seem to find any reference as to when to use what size. Thanks so much, and here’s hoping my table turns out anything like the one pictured here!

    • Heidi says

      You are going to love the Kreg Jig, Jeremy! I apologize for leaving out when to use the different sized screws. For all of the main assembly, use the 2.5 inch screws. When it’s time to attach the table top to the frame, we used 1.5 inch screws to ensure they wouldn’t poke out through the top of the table once turned right side up. Hope that helps and let us know if you have more questions! Good luck!

  10. Derek says

    Thank you so much for this great tutorial. I followed it and made the table and bench this weekend. I couldn’t find the leg anchor bolts you used but found other bolts in Home Depot. If anyone else has this issue, do some research on “Hanger Bolts”. Similar to the anchor bolts used in your tutorial. Hanger bolts have a corse thread on one end and machined on the other. They make a special bit for tightening these hanger bolts down but I simply used 2 nuts and threaded them all the way down to the corse thread. You may have to tweak the 45 degree corner supports to accommodate this type of bolt. I ended up cutting to about 7″ before I cut the 45 on them. You can use a crescent wrench to drive it into the legs. I also tweaked the Step 4 adding the ice box frame to the table top. Some of the middle boards in my table were warped. I added a couple extra pocket holes in the ice box frame to suck the table top boards down to the ice box frame. All in all it was a very good tutorial to follow. I love that you paid extra attention to making sure you stain the edges before installing boards. Things I learned: Sometimes it helps to pre-drill boards before driving screws into the board. This is very helpful to prevent the board from splitting. I did this method when assembling the ice box lids. My boards were super soft and split as soon as I placed my first screw. Pay close attention to how you set up your kreg jig. I was not set to exactly 1-1/2″ on the top column. I ended up screwing a couple through to the other side. I was careful to not screw through the top of the table but all the side rails ended up with a tip of the screw poking through. I was a 2×4 board under but over on a 2×8. I ended up ripping the 2×8 down and made a couple 2×4. I built the bench as well so combined the materials list. A cut list may be helpful as well as suggestions as to what cuts to make to each board. I tried to make a cut list and be efficient with cuts but still wound up short in material. Anyway thank you again for this. I will be enjoying my table for years to come thanks to you!

  11. Randy says

    I was wondering if anyone who’s built this has tried drilling a he in the middle for an umbrella? I’m all finished with mine but the staining and was contemplating doing this.

    • Heidi says

      Randy – we actually just drilled a hole in ours for an umbrella 2 weeks ago! My husband just made sure to drill the hole the exact diameter of our umbrella pole so that it doesn’t lean over.

    • Mike says

      Randy – I used a hole saw to add an opening for my umbrella. I tested first on a few scrap pieces of wood which I then cut directly down the middle and joined together around the umbrella. My first cut was too large and next was too small so I ended up taking a trip to HD as I needed 1 3/4 inch which wasn’t included in my kit. Good luck!

  12. Lauren says

    This looks awesome. My husband and I want to build it soon. Just wondering about how long it took you from start to finish, we are newbies at this. Thanks!

    • Heidi says

      Lauren, it took us a full weekend to build the table plus matching benches. Granted, we had to stop and take a lot of pictures, so that ate into our time – but if this will be your first big build, I would plan on a full weekend. It will be worth it!! Good Luck!

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